Barbara Janelle

Krieger-Kunz Therapeutic Touch

QUESTIONS & ANSWERS ABOUT THEREPEUTIC TOUCH: Epileptic Seizures

QUESTIONS & ANSWERS ABOUT THEREPEUTIC TOUCH: Epileptic Seizures

Compiled by Carolyn Buchanan & Sue Frid

In Touch, Vol. XIII, No. 1, February, 2001

Question: Are there any guidelines to observe when working with a child or adult who has epileptic seizures?

Answer from Barbara Janelle M.A.

I am not aware of any instance in the use of TT where it has initiated an epileptic seizure. Perhaps a seizure might occur if someone held his/her hands still around the head for five to ten minutes, or perhaps not.

Our general guidelines in Therapeutic Touch for working around the head include:

    1. Working gently – light, gentle, flowing movements
    2. Keeping hands moving – softly; I do find that an occasional pause of 1 to 3 seconds is useful in scanning
    3. Supporting the integration of the head with the rest of the body by addressing the energy flow through the entire field (Generally, we do not just work with the head.)
    4. Working for a brief period of time

It is a mistake to leave the head out of a treatment. The effect of not including the head in a full treatment to make the person very light-headed – almost dizzy.

In TT, we work on the basis of assessment. The field informs us and directs our work. Trusting that process is much more important and effective than worrying about whether we are doing something right or not. Worry and doubt only take us off center and interfere with the treatment.

An alternative and very gentle way of working with a field is to visualize the treatment:

    1. Touch the feet and support the flow of energy out of the feet through grounding visualization
    2. Then visualize the entire field/body connect to this grounding mechanism i.e. connected to these roots
    3. Visualize a pastel rainbow of gently dancing light to flow softly in through the crown and down through the field – brightening the entire field.
    4. Keep the treatment brief